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Pioneering Rehabilitation

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between an acute and sub acute rehabilitation Hospital? Back

Burke is an acute rehabilitation hospital. Patients are admitted who have a traumatic injury, debilitating disease or following certain types of surgery. Acute Rehabilitation is appropriate for patients who will benefit from an intensive, multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. Patients receive physical, occupational and speech therapy as needed and are medically managed by specially trained physicians. There is an attending physician onsite 24 hours a day to manage the medical aspects of each patient’s care. For patients with neurological diagnoses, a neuropsychologist is on staff to determine if they are in need of additional psychological or psychiatric treatment. In an acute rehabilitation hospital, the patient is expected to make significant functional gains and medical improvement within a reasonable time frame. Patients receive a minimum of three hours of therapy per day, up to six days a week. Therapy is provided on both a one to one and group basis, depending on the needs of the individual patient. Additional services such as respiratory therapy and therapeutic recreation programs are also available for patients during their rehabilitation.

Sub acute level care is less intensive than acute rehabilitation. Although a combination of physical, occupational and speech therapy may be provided in the sub acute setting, the number of hours each patient receives is lower. Generally, patients in a sub acute facility only receive between one and two hours of therapy per day. The average length of stay at a sub acute facility is also generally longer than at an acute hospital.

What types of patients do you treat? Back

Burke treats people who have experienced a disabling illness or injury. This includes: spinal cord injury, head trauma, amputation, stroke, cardiac and pulmonary disorders, arthritis and rheumatic joint diseases, including post joint replacement surgery, orthopedic disabilities and neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Guillian-Barre syndrome.

What kinds of inpatient services are provided? Back

Inpatients receive physical, occupational and speech language services, along with medical and nursing care and the services of social workers, therapeutic recreation therapists, respiratory therapists and dietitians.

What about outpatient services and programs? Back

Individuals may take advantage of a myriad of outpatient services, including: physical and occupational therapy; speech & language; dementia evaluation and treatment service; arthritis center; cardiac rehab, osteoporosis care center, specialized pulmonary programs; wheelchair and equipment education; driver evaluations; wheelchair sports; warm water pool exercise programs and customized exercise programs for individuals with disabilities.